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26 May 2011 @ 09:52 am
Indulgences a shot to the head, not the foot - Drill baby drill, shale's ok  

CCNet – 23 May 2011

The Climate Policy Network

British Industry Rebellion Over Carbon Targets

Chemical firms lead calls to halt a leap in carbon costs. Manufacturers say the move, taken with other plans, including a UK-only carbon tax, will cripple industry. They insist thousands of jobs will be lost as firms move their plants to countries where the cost of doing business is lower. Tata Steel last week announced it was cutting 1,500 jobs at its Scunthorpe and Teesside plants. Meanwhile, in a letter to No10 this month, Ineos founder Jim Ratcliffe warned that he could be forced to shut the firm’s Runcorn chlorine plant, a big energy user and employer of more than 1,000 people. --Danny Fortson, The Sunday Times, 22 May 2011

The current set of ‘green’ policies, whereby levies and taxes are used to punish the greatest energy users like the chemical sector, will prove to be economic suicide. If the government continues to simply add one energy or carbon reduction levy after another on to the energy-intensive sectors, then the risk is that these industries will no longer be able to compete internationally and will simply cease to operate in the UK. --David Merlin-Jones, The Sunday Times, 22 May 2011

Even if Chris Huhne does lose his job over allegedly persuading his ex-wife to take his penalty points for a speeding offence, he will have been in office long enough to leave a damaging legacy – last week’s Carbon Budget, which commits the UK to halving emissions of carbon dioxide by 2025. Mr Huhne’s Budget is likely to drive much of British industry abroad – to countries including the United States, China, India, Japan and everywhere else in Europe, which have made no binding CO2 commitments, and where energy will thus remain much cheaper. --David Rose, The Mail on Sunday, 22 May 2011

The government's flagship environmental policy, the "green deal" whereby millions of households are to be fitted with energy-saving technology, is likely to be rejected by homeowners because of its high cost, campaigners have warned. A report from the environmental thinktank E3G and research by the Green party MP Caroline Lucas suggest that householders' bills are likely to be so high there will not be enough of an incentive to "energy refurbish" a home. --Fiona Harvey, The Guardian, 19 May 2011

Once you examine it closely, the idea that "renewable" energy is green and clean looks less like a deduction than a superstition. --Matt Ridley, The Wall Street Journal, 21 May 2011

Life is about making decisions, and decisions are about trade-offs. We can choose to promote investment in technology that addresses real problems and scientific research that will let us cope with real problems more efficiently. Or we can be caught up in a crusade that seeks to suppress energy use, economic growth, and the benefits that come from the creation of national wealth. --William Happer, First Things, 20 May 2011

1) British Industry Rebellion Over Carbon Targets - The Sunday Times, 22 May 2011

2) Green Deal Likely To Push Rents Up Higher - The Henley Standard, 23 May 2011

3) Homeowners Will Reject 'Green Deal' For Its High Cost, Environment Group Warns -The Guardian, 19 May 2011

4) Christopher Booker: Wales In Revolt Over Mammoth Wind Farm Scheme - The Sunday Telegraph, 22 May 2011

5) David Rose: UK Carbon Budget - The Science Isn't Settled - Mail on Sunday, 22 May 2011

6) Matt Ridley: Inconvenient Truths About 'Renewable' Energy - The Wall Street Journal, 21 May 2011

7) William Happer: The Dubious Science Of The Climate Crusaders - First Things, 21 May 2011

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[If Chris Huhne loses his job over speeding ticket avoidance it is just further confirmation that eco fascist politics lives in a nasty fantasy world disconnected from reality.]
(More brilliant humour from the Telegraph's Matt here.)

[Huhne's dept took over the role of wind energy boondoggle imposition from EuLab. As if wind energy would ever be more than a blot on on the landscape and there is worse to come aside from the CCS boondoggle, purple electricity pylons, maybe as many as 500 per wind farm, including sea and estuary farms. If you thought triffid turbines were a diabolical scab on the countryside, wait until it is populated by pylons. Purple pylons. Why purple? Birds don't like purple so the turbines will be painted. The pylons will have to co-ordinate. No green spots? Stuff you, budgies and boondoggles are infinitely more important.]

CCNet – 24 May 2011

The Climate Policy Network  

UK Lawmakers Green Light Shale Gas Drilling

British lawmakers said Monday that shale gas resources in Britain should be developed to reduce the country's reliance on imported supplies. The approval makes it likely that Britain will follow in the footsteps of Poland, which last week announced plans for major investment in shale gas to break free of dependence on Russian imports and boost its economy. --Associated Press, 24 May 2011

Drilling for shale gas should not be banned and the new fuel source could improve national energy security, according to an influential committee of MPs. The energy and climate change committee report warned, however, that exploiting shale gas could steer investment away from lower-carbon energy. --Sylvia Pfeifer, Financial Times, 24 May 2011

A report by a committee of MPs ruled (sic) yesterday that controversial "shale" gas drilling should not be banned in the UK. In their report published yesterday, MPs on the Energy and Climate Change Committee echoed Matt Ridley’s enthusiasm for shale gas production, saying they found no evidence that the process for extracting it posed any risk to water supplies from underground aquifers. The MPs agreed that the new source of gas could improve this country’s energy security but warned it could also steer investment away from lower carbon energy sources such as renewables. --Peter McCusker, The Journal, 24 May 2011

There has been a lot of hot air recently about the dangers of shale gas drilling, but our inquiry found no evidence to support the main concern — that U.K. water supplies would be put at risk. There appears to be nothing inherently dangerous about the process of 'fracking' itself and as long as the integrity of the well is maintained shale gas extraction should be safe. --Tim Yeo, UK Energy and Climate Change Committee, 23 May 2011

Shale gas will encounter formidable opposition from entrenched and powerful interests in the environmental pressure groups, in the coal, nuclear and renewable industries, and from political inertia. Ultimately, it will be a matter of whether over-borrowed European governments, businesses and people will be able to resist such a hefty source of new revenue and a clean energy source requiring no subsidy. –-Matt Ridley, The Shale Gas Shock, May 2011

Governments are going to be more and more concerned at the subsidies they will have to pay for consumers, to have high-cost renewable energy. Governments hate admitting they got it wrong, but at the end of the day cheap energy will win over expensive energy. –Nigel Lawson, 12 May 2011

Europe's conventional climate and energy strategy now faces a huge challenge. Governments would be well advised not to squander this golden shale gas opportunity. –Benny Peiser, Public Service Europe, 9 May 2011

1) UK lawmakers green light shale gas drilling - Associated Press, 24 May 2011

2) UK Panel: No Water Risk From 'Fracking' - The Wall Street Journal, 23 May 2011

3) Shale gas gets support from MPs in new report - House of Commons Energy and Climate Change Committee, 23 May 2011

4) Green Light For Shale: British Hopes For New Energy Boom - The Northern Echo, 23 May 2011

5) Shale Gas ‘Calls Renewables’ Bluff’ - Petroleum-Economist, 12 May 2011

6) The Shale Gas Revolution In 12 Slides - Business Insider, 9 May 2011

7) Michael Levi: Rebutting The Howarth Shale Gas Study - Council on Foreign Relations, 20 May 2011