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Sycophant Nicola's Calm Stroll to Independence and surrender to the TTIP enemies of humanity


The Calm Stroll to Independence
24 Jun, 2016  Craig Murray
The UK was key to the worst elements of TTIP. Now the British people must ensure we never see its like again. This article was first carried by Huffington Post.
In the space of two years, trade – via the secretly negotiated EU-US deal TTIP – has gone from esoteric policy interest, to the heart of the biggest social movement in Europe for a generation, to an often misunderstood feature of a vitriolic referendum campaign.
TTIP and its parallel EU-Canada deal CETA have caused outrage across Europe. TTIP in particular often grabbed headlines during EU referendum campaigning.
And in a post-Brexit UK soon to be shorn of trade deals including its World Trade Organisation country commitments, trade will be front and centre of new policy-making for the foreseeable future.
Many will now rejoice that for the UK TTIP is dead in the water. Indeed, Brexit may be the killer blow to the deal across Europe. But while the UK has escaped TTIP’s corporate clutches as an EU member state, if the deal does survive the big picture will be a little more complex.
Key to understanding why TTIP may still have an impact on the UK is appreciating the extent to which the deal is intended to enable the EU and USA’s neoliberal agenda to be the template for world trade.
Defeated in previous attempts to secure a pro-business but anti-people and planet deal, the EU and USA simply decided to sidestep multilateralism to impose their will on the rest of the world.
As a secret meeting between the European Commission and Exxon Mobil revealed, the Commission has been shamelessly colluding with the world’s biggest corporations to assure them that through TTIP they can force countries outside the deal (“third countries”) to accept its terms: the eradication of social, health and environmental protections, the locked-in privatisation of public services, and a private justice system so corporations can sue governments for any policies hitting their profits.
As the head of policy at the organisation which wrote the official report into TTIP told a House of Lords committee on TTIP: “They [third countries] obey those rules or they do not export [into Europe], just like Switzerland.” And now, the UK.
As for CETA, the danger is still very much clear and present: the European Commission intends for the deal to be sealed and implemented ahead of a formalised Brexit and without any national parliament votes. Crucially, elements of the deal could apply to the UK even after Brexit.
In the EU, the UK was the most neoliberal country in an avowedly neoliberal bloc.
The UK government opposed any reforms being made to the toxic ISDS ‘corporate court’ mechanism in TTIP and CETA and buried research it commissioned showingnegative impacts of ISDS on the UK. It ensured UK MPs could not read the secret texts of the deal when it could have granted them access.
It has led the charge – against the wishes of the Obama administration – for financial deregulation to be included in TTIP.It doesn’t stop there. The UK chose to include the NHS in TTIP when it could have excluded it, and the government then refused to release legal advice it received on threats to the NHS from the deal. And in spite of David Cameron’s “greenest ever government” claims, the UK teamed up with Canada, the US Trade Representative, BP and Shell to demolish rules that prevent high-polluting forms of oil from entering Europe – with profound implications for climate change and consequently the lives of millions in the global South.
It is this neoliberal elevation of corporate profit above democracy, human rights and protection of the environment which the UK is now free to follow unilaterally in trade deals – unless the British people come together to stop.
EU trade policy has been nothing short of devastating for Southern countries. In this regard, TTIP was little more than the same policies that have destroyed lives and livelihoods in the global South being turned onto Europe by its own leaders, with scant regard for any semblance of democratic process.
Brexit has created the potential greater democratic control of trade deals. And we must ensure we use that to craft a trade policy that is geared to justice for the many rather than profits for the few.
Mark Dearn is Senior Trade Campaigner at War on Want.
http://www.waronwant.org/media/brexit-what-now-ttip-ceta-and-uk-trade

489 thoughts on “The Calm Stroll to Independence”
Alan June 26  https://www.craigmurray.org.uk/archives/2016/06/calm-stroll-independence/comment-page-5/#comment-606864
The UK was key to the worst elements of TTIP.

Now the British people must ensure we never see its like again. This article was first carried by Huffington Post.
In the space of two years, trade – via the secretly negotiated EU-US deal TTIP – has gone from esoteric policy interest, to the heart of the biggest social movement in Europe for a generation, to an often misunderstood feature of a vitriolic referendum campaign.
TTIP and its parallel EU-Canada deal CETA have caused outrage across Europe. TTIP in particular often grabbed headlines during EU referendum campaigning.
And in a post-Brexit UK soon to be shorn of trade deals including its World Trade Organisation country commitments, trade will be front and centre of new policy-making for the foreseeable future.
Many will now rejoice that for the UK TTIP is dead in the water. Indeed, Brexit may be the killer blow to the deal across Europe. But while the UK has escaped TTIP’s corporate clutches as an EU member state, if the deal does survive the big picture will be a little more complex.
Key to understanding why TTIP may still have an impact on the UK is appreciating the extent to which the deal is intended to enable the EU and USA’s neoliberal agenda to be the template for world trade.
Defeated in previous attempts to secure a pro-business but anti-people and planet deal, the EU and USA simply decided to sidestep multilateralism to impose their will on the rest of the world.
[The US and its EU]
As a secret meeting between the European Commission and Exxon Mobil revealed, the Commission has been shamelessly colluding with the world’s biggest corporations to assure them that through TTIP they can force countries outside the deal (“third countries”) to accept its terms: the eradication of social, health and environmental protections, the locked-in privatisation of public services, and a private justice system so corporations can sue governments for any policies hitting their profits.
As the head of policy at the organisation which wrote the official report into TTIP told a House of Lords committee on TTIP: “They [third countries] obey those rules or they do not export [into Europe], just like Switzerland.” And now, the UK.
As for CETA, the danger is still very much clear and present: the European Commission intends for the deal to be sealed and implemented ahead of a formalised Brexit and without any national parliament votes. Crucially, elements of the deal could apply to the UK even after Brexit.
In the EU, the UK was the most neoliberal country in an avowedly neoliberal bloc.
The UK government opposed any reforms being made to the toxic ISDS ‘corporate court’ mechanism in TTIP and CETA and buried research it commissioned showingnegative impacts of ISDS on the UK. It ensured UK MPs could not read the secret texts of the deal when it could have granted them access. It has led the charge – against the wishes of the Obama administration – for financial deregulation to be included in TTIP.
It doesn’t stop there. The UK chose to include the NHS in TTIP when it could have excluded it, and the government then refused to release legal advice it received on threats to the NHS from the deal. And in spite of David Cameron’s “greenest ever government” claims, the UK teamed up with Canada, the US Trade Representative, BP and Shell to demolish rules that prevent high-polluting forms of oil from entering Europe – with profound implications for climate change and consequently the lives of millions in the global South.
It is this neoliberal elevation of corporate profit above democracy, human rights and protection of the environment which the UK is now free to follow unilaterally in trade deals – unless the British people come together to stop.
EU trade policy has been nothing short of devastating for Southern countries. In this regard, TTIP was little more than the same policies that have destroyed lives and livelihoods in the global South being turned onto Europe by its own leaders, with scant regard for any semblance of democratic process.
Brexit has created the potential greater democratic control of trade deals. And we must ensure we use that to craft a trade policy that is geared to justice for the many rather than profits for the few.
Mark Dearn is Senior Trade Campaigner at War on Want.
http://www.waronwant.org/media/brexit-what-now-ttip-ceta-and-uk-trade

Alan https://www.craigmurray.org.uk/archives/2016/06/calm-stroll-independence/comment-page-5/#comment-607567
Alfred de Zayas, the U.N.’s Independent Expert on the Promotion of a Democratic and Equitable International Order, is assigned the task to apply the standards of international law to proposed treaties, to determine whether they’re in accord with international law. On Friday, June 24th, he issued his finding on three large proposed treaties regarding international trade among Atlantic countries: TTIP, TISA, and CETA. Earlier, on February 2nd, he had issued a similar finding on the proposed TPP treaty between Pacific countries, and his conclusion there was the same: that the proposed treaty violates international laws, and is inconsistent with democracy.
His finding regarding the proposed Atlantic treaties condemned them by saying: “Trade deals prepared and negotiated in secret, excluding key stakeholders such as labour unions, consumer associations, health professionals and environmental experts and now parliaments, have zero democratic legitimacy.” This describes all of U.S. President Barack Obama’s proposed treaties on trade: TPP, TTIP, and TISA, and it also includes CETA, which is the proposed treaty between the EU and Canada.
He further damningly noted that, “Disfranchising the public from participating in this important debate is undemocratic and manifests a profound disregard to peoples’ voice.”
The U.N.’s press release, on June 24th, from its Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR), especially notes:
An earlier consultation conducted by the European Commission in 2014 resulted in 97% of respondents from across Europe expressing opposition to the inclusion of asymmetrical investment protection in Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) with the USA. “The same would apply to CETA, but no consultation was ever held,” he noted.
“Asymmetrical investment protection” refers to the power that these proposed treaties grant to international corporations to sue (for alleged loss of their profits) nations that increase regulations to protect the safety of the public from toxic products, and from environmental harms, and that protect workers’ rights and other human rights that can also, in some circumstances, reduce corporate profits. “Asymmetrical” refers to the absence in the proposed treaty of any symmetrical power granted to a government to sue an international corporation that violates its laws to protect the public.
De Zayas goes further than merely charging that these treaties are “asymmetrical”: he adds that, “In case of conflict between trade agreements and human rights treaties, it is the latter that prevail. States must not enter into agreements that delay, circumvent, hinder or make impossible the fulfillment of human rights treaty obligations.”
In a statement to the Council of Europe, on April 19th, de Zayas had said: “Two ontologies seem to have been lost in the ideologically-driven corporate narrative. Firstly, the ontology of the State, its raison d’être to legislate in the public interest, including preventative measures to avert potential harm to the population. Secondly, the ontology of business, which is to take calculated risks for profit.” He meant there that these proposed treaties, which would enable the latter to override the former — enable international investors to override national sovereignty of democratic nations, and which would impose their own system of ‘arbitration’ that isn’t required to adhere to any nation’s laws and constitution — violate international law.
The U.N. OHCHR’s June 24th press release concludes by saying:
“Trade agreements should be ratified only after human rights, health and environmental impact assessments have been conducted, which has not been the case with regard to CETA and TTIP,” Mr. de Zayas said.
“Ratification of CETA and TTIP would start a ‘race to the bottom’ in human rights terms, and would seriously compromise the regulatory space of states. This is contrary to the Purposes and Principles of the UN Charter, and would constitute a serious obstacle to achieving a democratic and equitable international order,” the UN Independent Expert concluded.
The statements by the U.N.’s Independent Expert on the Promotion of a Democratic and Equitable International Order are damning against these proposed treaties. As the U.N.’s appointed independent legal counsel regarding these treaties, he is saying that, regardless of whether they will become law in any particular country, they are in clear violation of international law.
Eric Zuesse
https://www.sott.net/article/320856-U-Ns-legal-expert-Obamas-proposed-trade-deals-Illegal-and-have-zero-democratic-legitimacy
This is the deal that Craig and Nikki want Scotland to buy into. Good luck when Scotland ends up like Greece.

Scotland, Brits love you. We are beginning to wake up. Don't let the 'establishment's' Nicola BS you back into the EU death trap. Independence is neither here nor there, go for that if it suits you. True independence rather than pre-purposed temporary independence.

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